Vladimir Vysotsky

Vladimir Vysotsky (Владимир Высоцкий) was one of the most celebrated figures of the late Soviet underground cultural scene. He is best known as a Russian singer, performer, and poet and one of the founders of the Soviet bard tradition, but he was also an inspiration for many members of Soviet society who disagreed with the regime’s policies but were not able to dissent openly or politically.

Vysotsky was born outside Moscow in 1938 and grew up mainly in Moscow. He began writing poetry and songs when he was young, and his artistic career started when he attended the Moscow Art Theater (МХАТ) from 1956 to 1960, where he studied acting. He then started a very successful acting career, which the Soviet authorities accepted. His most famous role was as Hamlet, but he acted in many other stage and film roles.

Yet he surpassed his acting talents in his singing and songwriting, which the Soviet authorities condemned. His first songs also appeared around the time that he finished school: his first song is usually considered to be “Tattoo” (“Татуировка”), from 1961. Though he continued to act in theater from that point on, his music and poetry were arguably his primary focus. None of his music was officially released in the USSR until the late 1980s, but his homemade records were circulated underground long before that, and he also performed in clubs and universities. The overt subject matter of most of his songs was daily Soviet life, which he often subtly satirized, but his music was mainly known for displaying moral authority and conscience.

He died at 42 of a heart attack, generally thought to be a result of his drinking, and after his death many collections of his poetry and records were released in the USSR and abroad. There are now numerous streets, museums, and monuments in honor of him all over Russia and in other countries. Many Soviet and Russian poets and singers count him among their biggest influences, and many films and books have been made and written about him.

Find Vladimir Vysotsky on Amazon

 

“Wolf Hunt” (“Охота на волков”), from 1968:

 

Lyrics for“Охота на волков”:

Рвусь из сил и из всех сухожилий,
Но сегодня – опять, как вчера,-
Обложили меня, обложили,
Гонят весело на номера.

Из-за елей хлопочут двустволки –
Там охотники прячутся в тень.
На снегу кувыркаются волки,
Превратившись в живую мишень.

Идет охота на волков, идет охота!
На серых хищников – матерых и щенков.
Кричат загонщики, и лают псы до рвоты.
Кровь на снегу и пятна красные флажков.

Не на равных играют с волками
Егеря, но не дрогнет рука!
Оградив нам свободу флажками,
Бьют уверенно, наверняка.

Волк не может нарушить традиций.
Видно, в детстве, слепые щенки,
Мы, волчата, сосали волчицу
И всосали – Нельзя за флажки!

Идет охота на волков, идет охота!
На серых хищников – матерых и щенков.
Кричат загонщики, и лают псы до рвоты.
Кровь на снегу и пятна красные флажков.

Наши ноги и челюсти быстры.
Почему же – вожак, дай ответ –
Мы затравленно мчимся на выстрел
И не пробуем через запрет?

Волк не должен, не может иначе!
Вот кончается время мое.
Тот, которому я предназначен,
Улыбнулся и поднял ружье.

Идет охота на волков, идет охота!
На серых хищников – матерых и щенков.
Кричат загонщики, и лают псы до рвоты.
Кровь на снегу и пятна красные флажков.

Я из повиновения вышел
За флажки – жажда жизни сильней!
Только сзади я радостно слышал
Удивленные крики людей.

Рвусь из сил, из всех сухожилий,
Но сегодня – не так, как вчера!
Обложили меня, обложили,
Но остались ни с чем егеря!

Идет охота на волков, идет охота!
На серых хищников – матерых и щенков.
Кричат загонщики, и лают псы до рвоты.
Кровь на снегу и пятна красные флажков.
“I Don’t Love” (“Я не люблю”), 1969:

 

Lyrics for “Я не люблю”:

Я не люблю фатального исхода,
От жизни никогда не устаю.
Я не люблю любое время года,
Когда веселых песен не пою.

Я не люблю холодного цинизма,
В восторженность не верю, и еще –
Когда чужой мои читает письма,
Заглядывая мне через плечо.

Я не люблю, когда наполовину
Или когда прервали разговор.
Я не люблю, когда стреляют в спину,
Я также против выстрелов в упор.

Я ненавижу сплетни в виде версий,
Червей сомненья, почестей иглу,
Или – когда все время против шерсти,
Или – когда железом по стеклу.

Я не люблю уверенности сытой,
Уж лучше пусть откажут тормоза!
Досадно мне, что слово “честь” забыто,
И что в чести наветы за глаза.

Когда я вижу сломанные крылья –
Нет жалости во мне и неспроста.
Я не люблю насилье и бессилье,
Вот только жаль распятого Христа.

Я не люблю себя, когда я трушу,
Обидно мне, когда невинных бьют,
Я не люблю, когда мне лезут в душу,
Тем более, когда в нее плюют.

Я не люблю манежи и арены,
На них мильон меняют по рублю,
Пусть впереди большие перемены,
Я это никогда не полюблю.

 

Find Vladimir Vysotsky on Amazon

Julie is currently studying Russian as a Second Language in Irkutsk (and before that, Bishkek) with SRAS's Home and Abroad Scholarship program, with the goal of someday having some sort of Russia/Eurasia-related career. She recently got her master’s degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Tartu, where she studied women’s dissent in Soviet Russia. She also has a bachelor’s degree in literature from Yale. Some of her favorite Russian authors are Sorokin, Shishkin, Il’f and Petrov, and Akhmatova. In her spare time Julie cautiously practices martial arts, reads feminist websites, and taste-tests instant coffee for her blog.