Paulina Gagarina

Polina Gagarina (Полина Гагарина) is a Russian singer and Russia’s entry into the 2015 Eurovision Song Contest, where she placed second in a difficult, politically charged atmosphere.

Gagarina was interested in music from her childhood, often giving loud, heartfelt performances to her parents. The turning point for her was hearing Whitney Houston perform on TV; she was accepted into music school in Saratov with her own rendition of “I Will Always Love You.” Afterward, she attended a variety-jazz school in Moscow, and in her second year joined the TV show Star Factory–2 (Фабрика звезд, the first season of which was where Zhenya Milkovskiy got his start) and won. Yet she chose not to sign on with the producers, worried about losing her individuality and independence or being forced to change her voice and image. Instead, she returned to school.

Gagarina’s solo career began two years later, when she agreed to sign on with producer Igor Yakovlevich. Her first song, “Lullaby” (“Колыбельная”), was released in 2005, and her first album, Ask the Clouds (Попроси у облаков), appeared two years later. Along with her friend and fellow Star Factory competitor Irina Dutsova, she recorded the song “For Who, For What?” (“Кому, зачем?”), which became extremely popular. She continued her musical education even while her stardom rose, graduating from the school/studio of the Moscow Art Theater in 2010, after the release of her second album. Her albums—there are three in total—have found popular and critical success, and she has won many of Russia’s major music prizes. She was the runner-up in the 2015 Eurovision with her song “A Million Voices.”

Gagarina is now a solo singer and composer and produces her music herself, preferring not to depend on a production company. According to her website, she aims to combine different styles, genres, moods, and languages in her songs, taking full advantage of her independence.

“Lullaby,” Gagarina’s first single:

Lyrics for “Lullaby”:

Загляни ты в сердечко мне
И скажи “уходи” зиме
Ветер воет, а ты грей меня
Небо стонет, а у нас весна

Попроси у облаков
Подарить нам белых снов
Ночь плывет и мы за ней
В мир таинственных огней

Разгони ты тоску во мне
Неспокойно у меня в душе

Попроси у облаков
Подарить нам белых снов
Ночь плывет и мы за ней
В мир таинственных огней

Попроси у облаков
Подарить нам белых снов
Ночь плывет и мы за ней
В мир таинственных огней

Попроси у облаков
Подарить нам белых снов
Ночь плывет и мы за ней
В мир таинственных огней

Попроси у облаков…

“I Won’t” (“Я не буду”), Gagarina’s latest single, from 2015:

С чистого, опять ступать, листа,
Я жила тобой, теперь пуста.
Что дальше, что дальше будет,
Всё равно.

Ангел или бес, ты мой обман.
Таял уходя, в ночной туман.
Что дальше, а дальше.
Я скажу одно:

Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Оставляю тебя в прошлом.
Отныне ты мне стал не мил.
Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Извини, но абонент больше недоступен.
Больше недоступен.

Робкий шаг вперед и два назад,
То застывший лёд, то водопад.
Что дальше, что дальше будет,
Всё равно.

Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Оставляю тебя в прошлом.
Отныне ты мне стал не мил.
Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Извини, но абонент больше недоступен.
Больше недоступен.

Я не буду, я не буду…
Я не буду ждать тебя…
Я не будe… я не буду…
И я не буду…
Я не буду … я не буду…
И я не буду.
Я не буду … я не буду…
И я не буду ждать тебя.

Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Оставляю тебя в прошлом.
Отныне ты мне стал не мил.
Я не буду тебя больше.
Я не буду тебя больше, больше ждать.
Извини, но абонент больше недоступен.
Больше недоступен.

“A Million Voices,” Gagarina’s 2015 Eurovision entry:

Julie is currently studying Russian as a Second Language in Irkutsk (and before that, Bishkek) with SRAS’s Home and Abroad Scholarship program, with the goal of someday having some sort of Russia/Eurasia-related career. She recently got her master’s degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Tartu, where she studied women’s dissent in Soviet Russia. She also has a bachelor’s degree in literature from Yale. Some of her favorite Russian authors are Sorokin, Shishkin, Il’f and Petrov, and Akhmatova. In her spare time Julie cautiously practices martial arts, reads feminist websites, and taste-tests instant coffee for her blog.