Sergei Chigrakov (Сергей Чиграков, also called Chizh / Чиж) is a Soviet and Russian singer, songwriter, poet, and guitarist best known as founder and frontman of Chizh & Co (Чиж & Со). He has also participated in Different People (Разные люди), The Colonel and Fellow Soldiers (Полковник и Однополчане), and Shiva (Шива).

Born to a working class family on February 6, 1961 in Dzerzhinsk (Дзержинск), a city 25 miles west of Nizhny Novgorod (Нижний Новгород), Chigrakov began learning guitar from his older brother in sixth grade. Although initially expelled for truancy, he graduated from the local music school with honors before continuing his education at the Leningrad State Institute of Culture (LGIK), where he specialized in orchestral conducting and folk instruments.

Chigrakov served in the army from 1983 – 85. While stationed in the port city Ventspils, Latvia, he continued to play guitar and practice songwriting. After the army, Chigrakov again studied at LGIK, this time as a jazz drummer before returning to Dzerzhinsk as a music teacher. He performed with an ensemble specializing in gypsy weddings before joining the local hard rock band GPD (ГПД, an acronym for Extended Day Group – Группа Продлённого Дня). Chigrakov graduated from LGIK in 1989, moved to Kharkov (Харьков), changed GPD’s lineup and renamed the band Different People. In 1991, Chigrakov recorded Boogie-Kharkov (Буги-Харьков) – an album composed entirely of his own songs.

Chigrakov and Different People split over differences concerning Boogie-Kharkov, and Chigrakov soon found himself in St. Petersburg, working with artists from DDT (ДДТ) and St. Petersburg (the band) until he found members for his new project, Chizh & Co (Чиж & Co).

Chigrakov gained the most popularity as frontman of Chizh & Co, which was most active during the mid-nineties. The songs “Oh Love” (“О любви”), “Forever Young” (“Вечная молодость”), and “That Bullet Whistled” (“Вот пуля просвистела”) became classics among post-Soviet youth.

 

A live version of Chizh & Co’s “That Bullet Whistled” (““Вот пуля просвистела”):

Lyrics for “Вот пуля просвистела”:

 

Вот пуля просвистела, в грудь попала мне,
Спасся я в степи на лихом коне,
Но шашкою меня комиссар достал,
Покачнулся я и с коня упал.

Эй, ой, да конь мой вороной,
Эй, да обрез стальной,
Эй, да густой туман,
Эй, ой, да батька-атаман,
Да батька-атаман.

На одной ноге я пришёл с войны,
Привязал коня, сел я у жены,
Но часу не прошло комиссар пришёл,
Отвязал коня и жену увёл.

Эй, ой, да конь мой вороной,
Эй, да обрез стальной,
Эй, да густой туман,
Эй, ой, да батька-атаман,
Да батька-атаман.

Спаса со стены под рубаху снял,
Хату подпалил да обрез достал.
При Советах жить – торговать, свой крест,
Сколько нас таких уходило в лес.

Эй, ой, да конь мой вороной,
Эй, да обрез стальной,
Эй, да густой туман,
Эй, ой, да батька-атаман.

Эй, ой, да конь мой вороной,
Эй, да обрез стальной,
Эй, да густой туман,
Эй, ой, да батька-атаман,
Да батька-атаман.

 

The band Different People performing Boogie Kharkov (Буги-Харьков):

Lyrics for Буги-Харьков: 

 

Я приехал сюда, чтоб играть в группе “Разные Люди”
Я живу на квартире, спаленной Рауткинским “Краем”
Я хожу на работу, чтоб спасти от любови студенток
Репетирую рядом с “ГП”, “ШОКом”, “37Т”, “Раем”

Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-Харьков
Буги-вуги-Харьков, мiсто Харькiв, будь здоров.
Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-Харьков
Буги-вуги-Харьков…

Иногда я хожу на “Сквозняк”, чтобы встретиться с кофе
Там знакомые лица, которых дожди не пугают
И грустная “Мама” обаятельного Кошмара
Вот уже третий месяц из моей головы не вылазит.

Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-Харьков
Буги-вуги-Харьков, mister Kharkov, будь здоров.
Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-Харьков
Буги-вуги-Харьков…

Доктор Хэммил со мной сосед, он играет на “кубе”
Жаль, что я не застал балтиморского парня Захара
А пока мой маршрут неизменен – ХАИ да Сумская
Да две общаги – та, что на Артема , и что на Отакара

Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-fuck off
Буги-вуги-Харьков, мистер Харьков, будь здоров.
Буги-вуги-Харьков, буги-вуги-Харьков
Буги-вуги-Харьков…

Katheryn Weaver is a student of rhetoric and history at the University of Texas, Austin. Her primary areas of investigation include revolution and the rhetorical justification of violence against individuals, state, and society. She is currently studying Russian as a Second Language with SRAS's Home and Abroad Scholarship.