Oakland

Oakland

Published: September 22, 2016

Oakland is a rap group from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan—one of the few (but not the only!) major Kyrgyz rap groups. The group originally consisted of Samat Ismailov (Сэм or Sammy Colt), Dmitry Vorsin (Дима or Noma), and Sardar Zhakypbekov, though Sardar left early on. They rap mainly in Russian rather than Kyrgyz, but they feel themselves to be essentially Kyrgyz: Sammy said in an interview with One Mag that “our goal is to be popular in the CIS countries, not forgetting where we are from. We want to place Bish [Bishkek] on the rap map of the world.”

The group was started in 2005, when the three were all studying together at the Kyrgyz–Russian Slavic University in Bishkek and decided to start making music together. Oakland is known mainly for their song “Malyshka Bi” (“Малышка Би”), a collaboration with singer Nurbek Savitakhunov and group City. They’ve also had a further collaboration with Nurbek, their 2012 song “Knock at the Door” (“Стук в дверь”). They’ve had a number of other hits that became popular all over Kyrgyzstan, some collected on their 2013 album, Once in Bishe [Bishkek] (Однажды в Бише). Dima is the lyricist of the group, while Sammy writes the music.

They’ve used a range of musical styles over the years—Dima calls them simply “hitmakers”—and have evolved several times over the years. Recently they’ve changed again, with Sardar rejoining the collective, and are ready to get started making new music and recording new music videos. Sammy has also recently started a new project, Okean x Colt, with which he won the Bishkek Street Credibility Fest 2016 (a hip-hop festival). His latest album has just been released.

 

“Knock at the Door” (“Стук в дверь”):

 

Lyrics for “Knock at the Door”:

Припев:

Я знаю выпадает шанс одному из ста,
И все встает на свои места,
И я шел и пришел час моего шоу,
Поверь, я достучался в эту дверь.
Я знаю никогда не был успех так сладок
Забудь навсегда тот горький осадок,
И я шел и пришел час моего шоу,
Поверь, я достучался в эту дверь.

Это было мечтой
Успех длинной в лимузин
Это было игрой
Я как Ассасин
Святые Shakur и Chris Wallace
Оценят мою подачу навыки и голос
Не стал я тем хотела кем
Видеть меня Ма
Свое время не продаем за дарма
Пылиться бокал или искриться Don Perignon
Мы делаем попрежнему дело вдвоем
Запечатлим момент почему нет
Тост за молодых мужчин серьезный аргумент
Перемен требуют наши сердца
Целый мир увидят мои глаза
Разменивая время на разные соблазны
Празднуем! Эту жизнь мы празднуем
И я смотрю в окно мелькают огни
И я знаю одно меня ждут они

Припев

Каждый новый с чистого листа
Каждый новый день репутация чиста
Все на свои места все на своих местах
Не ждет лишь время на моих часах
Ждет ли успех все ради одного
Ждет но не всех я против мира всего
Мой мир я в нем в главной роли
365 дел где бы я хотел быть в доле
Я открыл тайник у себя в голове
Это сокровище всегда было во мне
Плавая на дне взлететь высоко
От места моего до Эвереста далеко
И я смотрю в окно мелькают огни
И я знаю одно меня ждут они
Я разрушил свой забор от забот
Готов ко всему
Пусть только мир подождет

Припев

Жил но не так
Любил но не так
Была жизнь как
Сплошной бардак
Нужны слова важны слова
Поверь
Я открою эту дверь

Припев

 

“Unknown Girl” (“Незнакомка”):

Lyrics unfortunately not available. If you find or transcribe them, let us know!

 

About the author

Julie Hersh

Julie Hersh

Julie is currently studying Russian as a Second Language in Irkutsk (and before that, Bishkek) with SRAS's Home and Abroad Scholarship program, with the goal of someday having some sort of Russia/Eurasia-related career. She recently got her master’s degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Tartu, where she studied women’s dissent in Soviet Russia. She also has a bachelor’s degree in literature from Yale. Some of her favorite Russian authors are Sorokin, Shishkin, Il’f and Petrov, and Akhmatova. In her spare time Julie cautiously practices martial arts, reads feminist websites, and taste-tests instant coffee for her blog.

Program attended: Art and Museums in Russia

View all posts by: Julie Hersh